Monthly Archive: January, 2013

Shark Attack!


Shark attacks are one of the worlds most fascinating, yet rather unfortunate, events in the constant battle between humans and nature. Sadly, sharks often fall at the losing end, with some species being… Continue reading

Help support our Expedition


Help support our expedition to Madagascar! Click here to find out more!

Review: Rachel Carson – Silent Spring


(Fish and Wildlife Service employee photo: Rachel Carson)    Silent Spring, published in 1962, was a key to the environmental revolution in the late 20th century. Rachel Carson dedicated her life to biology,… Continue reading

Ideas for the future


Some great sites with amazing suggestions: 1) Homesteading and Survivalism       Amazing site built by a team dedicated to sustainable living and recycling. Find them on Facebook; they post some incredible pictures, like… Continue reading

Review: Chasing Ice


Chasing ice is the the multiple award-winning story of one, rather eccentric, man’s battle against climate change. As a geologist with a passion for the planet, James Balog tells the story, to put… Continue reading

Edible Insects?


If you enter ‘edible insects’ into Google, you are immediately confronted by websites offering fried grasshoppers and butterfly sweets; it’s clearly a big market, so what are we missing? ‘Entomophagy’ (insect eating) is… Continue reading

CCTV for animals? Introducing The Camera Trap


So what actually is a camera trap? It sounds like some kind of menacing, evil contraption; but the camera trap is in fact a key, upcoming piece of equipment used (mainly) to study… Continue reading

Review: Attenborough: 60 years in the wild


Sir David Attenborough seems to never stop, who through television and film-making has inspired generations of conservationists and nature-lovers with spectacular images of nature and wildlife. The most renown, respected, and loved television… Continue reading

Dame Jane Goodall


Women in science are few and far between, especially those that stand to make a real change. Dame Jane Goodall pioneered the study of primatology with her 45 year study on chimpanzees in… Continue reading

Poisoning the Galapagos


Arguably the most talked about archipelago on the planet, the Galapagos Islands are a hub of fascination, where tourism and conservation go head to head in an economically-driven, Ecuadorian-run, battle for conservation. After… Continue reading